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Santiago

This is a candid street portrait I did in my city at the Plaza de Armas

Puerto Rico

PCOS is a photographic project that records my journey since March 2021, when I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Through an exploration of the self, I analyze my condition, how it manifests in my body, my mind, and the experience of regulating it.

PCOS, in its most simple forms, is a condition that only female-born women can experience. The leading diagnosis notices multiple ovarian cysts in the ovaries. However, PCOS extends further and complicates many areas of the female reproductive system such as an irregularity in your hormones, insulin level and menstruation cycles. Other symptoms may be excess hair growth, acne, obesity, inflammation, excess androgen, and dark patches in the skin, among others. Bodily and mental complications include infertility, diabetes, natural miscarriages, metabolic syndrome, sleep apnea, mood swings, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, abnormal uterine bleeding, and endometrial cancer. Because of the different components of the condition, the photographs were taken around four categories: body, mind, treatment and food. Together the photographs present to the viewer a fragmented image of my body and my PCOS.

Learning about the condition and its complications came as a shock but also gave me a sense of reassurance. After 22 years, I finally feel like I am making progress towards truly connecting and controlling my body. The diagnosis made me spiral into a deep investigation of why it took so long to determine a condition that affected every aspect of my life, and in that investigation I was taken aback about how many women go undiagnosed, the gaslighting that the healthcare system in the USA consistently presents to women of color and the difference between the diagnosis of male and female doctors.

Stockholm

My mom came to visit me in Stockholm. We spent the day out at Djurgården and took the bus back home. I love her.

Athens

KIT(s)chen is an artwork which explores women's multiple everyday roles. Housewife, mother, dauther, sister, a woman. Women still searching for equality, still fighting for their freedom, for their right to live for themselves, to love whomever they please. Still fight for freedom of action.

To define yourself and set your own boundaries is a long and hard process. KIT(s)chen is a comment on the deformations and distortions produced by the modern feminism.

Austin

Taken September 26, 2020
We didn't know why, but my husband was in excruciating pain. I couldn't get him into our car to take him to the hospital. We were both terrified what him going to the hospital would mean as he would be alone. The pandemic made it so family could not be with loved ones in the hospital. I took this picture as my husband was being put into the back of an ambulance because I didn't know when I would see him again. He would ride in the ambulance alone, and be in the hospital alone. I waited 5 hours in the parking lot of the hospital that night. My husband had an emergency appendectomy and 8mm kidney stone. Due to Covid, they sent him home less than 8 hours after that ambulance ride. This photo sums up so much for me. The medical staff and ambulance are a light of hope in the darkness. The love of my life for over 33 years being taken away from me. Both of us separated from each other, and being scared of what going into the hospital would mean. Not only were we scared of his pain, but scared that he would contract the virus while being treated in the hospital. So many had been separated from their loved ones during that year, and have felt as I did then. When would I see my loved one again? Are they alright? Will the virus seize them too?

Zhovti Vody

This photo is about modern girls who can be very strong, despite their fragility, lead people and be real inspirations.

Carpi

As an oyster to the shell we are tied to our bodies Plato wrote, so the body of the woman is tied to an indelible collective imagination and in the same way I am tied to my body and theirs.

Bologna

"I've got sunshine on a cloudy day"
The contrast between visible and apparently visible generates some kind of interest in the observer. A feeling that opens the doors of imagination, disorienting the common sense that makes things already fully visible.